history of laboratories histoire des laboratoires history

University of Pennsylvania, USA; Brett Delahunt, BSc Hons BMedSc MB ChB MD FRCPA FFSc ... USA; Chris Meijer, MD, PhD, VU University, The Netherlands; George Netto, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins ...... Fox AR, Houser KH, Morris WR,.
5MB taille 11 téléchargements 92 vues
Canadian Journal of

Volume 9 | Issue/numéro 1

pathology pathologie Revue canadienne de

©St. Michael’s Hospital Archives and Medical Media Department

History of Laboratories Histoire des Laboratoires

PM 43322513

www.cap-acp.org

Marie Abi Daoud, MD, MHSc, FRCPC; Hala Faragalla MD, FRCPC; Louis Gaboury, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.P.(C), F.C.A.P.; John Gartner, MD CM, FRCPC; Laurette Geldenhuys, MBBCH, FFPATH, MMed, FRCPC, MAEd, FIAC; Nadia Ismiil, MBChB, FRCPC; Jason Karamchandani, MD; Adriana Krizova MD, MSc, FRCPC; David Munoz, MD, MSc, FRCPC; Christopher Naugler, MD, FRCPC; Tony Ng, MD, PhD FRCPC; Sharon Nofech-Mozes, MD; Maria Pasic, PhD, FCACB; Aaron Pollett, MD, MSc, FRCPC; Harman Sekhon, MD, PhD, FCAP; Monalisa Sur, MBBS, FCPath, MMed., MRCPath, FRCPC; Aducio Thiesen, MD, PhD, MSc, FRCPC; Stephen Yip, MD, PhD, FRCPC

iNterNatioNaL editoriaL board Fredrik Bosman, MD, PhD, University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Daniel Chanm, PhD, DABCC, FACB, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA; Runjan Chetty, MB BCh, FRCPA, FFPath, FRCPath, FRCPC, FCAP, Dphil, University of Tornto, Canada; Kumarasen Cooper ,MBChB, Dphil, FRC path, University of Pennsylvania, USA; Brett Delahunt, BSc Hons BMedSc MB ChB MD FRCPA FFSc FRCPath, University of Otago, New Zealand; Sunil R Lakhani, BSc (Hon), MBBS, MRCPath, MD, FRCPath, FRCPA, The University of Queensland, Australia; Virginia A. LiVolsi, MD, MASCP, University of Pennsylvania, USA; Ricardo Lloyd, MD, PhD, University of Wisconsin, USA; Jesse Mckenney, MD, Cleveland Clinic, USA; Chris Meijer, MD, PhD, VU University, The Netherlands; George Netto, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA; Isobel Scarisbrick, PhD, Mayo Clinic, USA; Manfred Schmitt, Dr. rer. nat., Dr. med. habil. (Ph. D., M.D. sci.), Dipl.-Biologist, Technical University, Munich, Germany; Iris Schrijver, MD, Stanford University, USA; Andreas Scorilas, PhD, University of Athens, Greece; Ming Tsao, FRCPC, MD, University of Toronto, Canada; Mark Wick, MD, University of Virginia, USA

CoMitÉ de rÉdaCtioN Marie Abi Daoud, M. D., M. Sc. S, FRCPC; Hala Faragalla, M. D., FRCPC; Louis Gaboury, M. D., Ph. D., FRCPC, FCAP; John Gartner, M. D. CM, FRCPC; Laurette Geldenhuys, MBBCH, FFPATH, MMed, FRCPC, MAEd, FIAC; Nadia Ismiil, MBChB, FRCPC; Jason Karamchandani, M. D.; Adriana Krizova M. D., M. Sc, FRCPC; David Munoz, M. D., M. Sc, FRCPC; Christopher Naugler, M. D., FRCPC; Tony Ng, M. D., Ph. D., FRCPC; Sharon Nofech-Mozes, M. D.; Maria Pasic, Ph. D., FCACB; Aaron Pollett, M. D., M. Sc, FRCPC; Harman Sekhon, M. D., Ph. D, FCAP; Monalisa Sur, MBBS, FCPath, MMed., MRCPath, FRCPC; Aducio Thiesen, M. D., Ph. D, M. Sc, FRCPC; Stephen Yip, M. D., Ph. D, FRCPC

CoMitÉ de rÉdaCtioN iNterNatioNaL Fredrik Bosman, M. D., Ph. D., Université de Lausanne, Suisse; Daniel Chanm, Ph. D., DABCC, FACB, faculté de médecine de l’Université Johns Hopkins, É.-U.; Runjan Chetty, MB BCh, FRCPA, FFPath, FRCPath, FRCPC, FCAP, Dphil, Université de Toronto, Canada; Kumarasen Cooper ,MBChB, Dphil, FRC path, Université de la Pennsylvania, É.-U.; Brett Delahunt, B. Sc Hons BMedSc MB ChB MD FRCPA FFSc FRCPath, Université d’Otago, Nouvelle-Zélande; Sunil R Lakhani, B. Sc (Hon), MBBS, MRCPath, M. D., FRCPath, FRCPA, Université de Queensland, Australie; Virginia A. LiVolsi, M. D., MASCP, Université de la Pennsylvanie, É.-U.; Ricardo Lloyd, M. D., Ph. D, Université du Wisconsin, É.-U.; Jesse Mckenney, M. D., Clinique de Cleveland, É.-U.; Chris Meijer, M. D., Ph. D., Université VU, Pays-Bas; George Netto, M. D., Ph. D., faculté de médecine de l’Université Johns Hopkins, É.-U.; Isobel Scarisbrick, Ph. D., Clinique Mayo, É.-U.; Manfred Schmitt, Dr. rer. nat., Dr. med. habil. (Ph. D., M.D. sci.), Dipl.-Biologist, Université polytechnique, Munich, Allemagne; Iris Schrijver, M. D., Université Stanford, É.-U.; Andreas Scorilas, Ph. D., Université d’Athènes, Grèce; Ming Tsao, FRCPC, M. D., Université de Toronto, Canada; Mark Wick, M. D., Université de la Virginie, É.-U.

CoMitÉ de rÉdaCtioN

editoriaL board

editoriaL board

Canadian Journal of Pathology | www.cap-acp.org

3

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

NAVIGATING THROUGH A NEW AGE OF DIGITAL PATHOLOGY: PROMISES AND CHALLENGES t is now clear that pathology practice is heading steadily towards a new and revolutionary phase of digital pathology. Digital pathology is slowly being incorporated into different aspects of our practice. It all started with digital pathology for education and performance assessment which was the first successful stop in the journey. Digital evaluation of pathology trainees is now a reality and the Canadian Royal College certification examination in pathology is already fully digitalized.1 Digital competency evaluation has many advantages over classic examination styles. Moreover, there are accumulating reports showing the great potential of telepathology for consultation, both intraoperative and routine diagnostic consults.3 A major breakthrough that enhanced the digital pathology revolution was the accurate and quick development of high resolution scanning (virtual images) which has now reach the level of being very comparable to regular glass slides. It is not surprising that there are a number of studies assessing the value of digital pathology slides for routine diagnosis, in a manner similar to digital radiology practice. Added to this is the growing trend towards the use of telepathology for quality assurance purposes. More recently, simulated learning and virtual reality learning are being considered for pathology teaching.

I

practicing pathologists, in a simple understandable format is essential to reach an informed decision about practice changes. We encourage articles that address these issues and study the attitude of pathologists and health care providers in this regard. We are also planning to publish a “digital pathology corner” with brief to-the-point facts and information for pathologists, residents and technologists. More in-depth studies are needed to evaluate the practical utility of digital and telepathology. Many other issues have to be addressed, including cost effectiveness, ethical, safety, legal and regulatory issues. The journal is collaborating with the Pathology Informatics Interest Group of the Canadian Association of Pathologists to highlight and address these concerns. We strongly believe that more serious discussions, open and transparent research publications will truly guide us into this new exciting era of our practice. George M. Yousef MD, PhD, FRCPC(Path) Editor-in-Chief, Canadian Journal of Pathology References

To find our way through this interesting, but also complex change for our profession, the pathology community needs to have more discussion and understanding of the potentials and limitations of this new technology.3 At the Canadian Journal of Pathology, we strongly believe in the importance of more open discussions and research projects that will enable the pathology community to move in the right direction. We took an initiative to support and prioritize the publication of studies on digital pathology, telepathology and pathology informatics, which can be a bit challenging to publish in other specialty journals. The editorial board of the journal is also planning to publish review articles and editorials to enrich the discussion about the value, the needs, and the challenges of digital pathology. Another interesting aspect of digital pathology is the need for digital pathology education. Knowledge transmission to 4

Canadian Journal of Pathology | Volume 9, Issue 1 | www.cap-acp.org

1. Mirham L, Naugler C, Hayes M, Ismiil N, Belisle A, Sade S, et al. Performance of residents using digital images versus glass slides on certification examination in anatomical pathology: a mixed methods pilot study. CMAJ Open. 2016;4:E88-94. 2. Bernard C, Chandrakanth SA, Cornell IS, Dalton J, Evans A, Garcia BM et al. Guidelines from the Canadian Association of Pathologists for establishing a telepathology service for anatomic pathology using whole-slide imaging. J Pathol Inform. 2014;5:15. 3. Gabril MY, Yousef GM. Informatics for practicing anatomical pathologists: marking a new era in pathology practice. Mod Pathol. 2010;23:349-58.

Canadian Journal of

editor-iN-CHief George M Yousef, MD, PhD FRCPC (Path) editor eMeritUs J. Godfrey Heathcote, MA, MB, BChir, PhD, FRCPC

Official Publication of the Canadian Association of Pathologists

table of Contents

4

foUNdiNG editor Jagdish Butany, MBBS, MS, FRCPC MaNaGiNG editor Deborah McNamara

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief Navigating Through a New Age of Digital Pathology: Promises and Challenges

©St. Michael’s Hospital Archives and Medical Media Department

Volume 9 | issue 1

pathology

editoriaL CoNteNt MaNaGer Heather Dow art direCtor Sherri Keenan traNsLatioN Lorraine Boury Jocelyne Demers-Owoka Éliane Fréchette PUbLisHiNG aGeNCy Clockwork Communications inc. PO Box 33145, Halifax, NS, B3L 4T6 902.442.3882 / [email protected]

8

12

Canadian Journal of Pathology is a peer-reviewed journal published four times per year, by Clockwork Communications Inc., on behalf of the Canadian Association of Pathologists. We welcome editorial submissions to [email protected] We cannot assume responsibility or commitment for unsolicited material. Any editorial material, including photographs, that are accepted from an unsolicited contributor, will become the property of the Canadian Association of Pathologists. Copyright Canadian Association of Pathologists (CAP-ACP). All rights reserved. Reprinting in part or in whole forbidden without express written consent from CAP-ACP. Publications Mail Agreement No. 43322513 ISSN 1918-915X (print) ISSN 1918-9168 (online) Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Canadian association of Pathologists 4 Cataraqui Street, Suite 310 Kingston, Ontario K7K 1Z7

eDitoRial Vital Organoids: Emerging Potential in Disease Modeling Authors: Zsuzsanna Lichner, Elen Gócza, George M Yousef

ReseaRCh aRtiCle Short-Term Trends in Test Volumes and Positivity Rates for Three Common Microbiology Tests Authors: Amina Kadri, Deirdre Church, Christopher Naugler

25

histoRiCal aRtiCles Are We There Yet? A History of The Medical Laboratories at St. Michael’s Hospital Author: M Bernadette Garvey

59 74

Case RepoRts & ReVieWs Phialophora Verrucosa Infection of an Orbital Implant Peg System – Case Report and Review of the Literature Authors: Harleen Bedi et al.

Unusual Presentation of Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma/Leukemia with Extensive Lytic Bone Lesions. Biopsy Specimens Authors: Suvra Roy et al.

www.cap-acp.org

Revue canadienne de pathologie | volume 9, numéro 1 | www.cap-acp.org

5

LETTRE DU RÉDACTEUR EN CHEF

TRAVERSER UNE NOUVELLE ÈRE DE PATHOLOGIE NUMÉRIQUE : ESPOIRS ET DÉFIS

I

l est maintenant bien évident que la pratique de la pathologie entame progressivement une nouvelle phase révolutionnaire de pathologie numérique. Différents aspects de notre pratique ont maintenant de plus en plus recours à la pathologie numérique. Tout a commencé avec la pathologie numérique pour les évaluations pédagogiques et de rendement où elle a connu ses premiers succès. Les évaluations numériques des stagiaires en pathologie sont maintenant une réalité et l’examen d’agrément du Collège royal des pathologistes du Canada est déjà entièrement numérisé. 1 L’évaluation des compétences numériques comporte de nombreux avantages comparativement aux styles d’évaluation classiques. En outre, de plus en plus de rapports attestent de l’excellent potentiel de la télépathologie pour la consultation, à la fois pour les consultations de diagnostic peropératoire et de routine.2 Une percée majeure qui a permis d’accélérer la révolution de la pathologie numérique a été le développement précis et rapide du balayage à haute résolution (images virtuelles) qui a maintenant atteint un niveau très comparable aux plaques en verre régulières. Il n’est donc pas surprenant que de nombreuses études examinent l’importance des lames de pathologie numérique pour les diagnostics de routine de manière semblable à la pratique de la radiologie numérique. Ajoutons à cela la tendance croissante de l’utilisation de la télépathologie aux fins d’assurance de la qualité. Plus récemment d’ailleurs, on envisage d’introduire dans l’enseignement de la pathologie l’apprentissage par simulation et l’apprentissage par réalité virtuelle. Pour nous retrouver dans tous ces changements intéressants, mais complexes que subit notre profession, la communauté des pathologistes doit comprendre et engager des discussions sur les possibilités et les limites de cette nouvelle technologie.3 La Revue canadienne de pathologie croit fermement à l’importance d’avoir des discussions plus ouvertes et de mener des projets de recherche qui permettront à la communauté de pathologistes de s’orienter dans la bonne direction. Nous avons pris l’initiative d’appuyer et de donner priorité à la publication d’études traitant de la pathologie numérique, de la télépathologie et de l’informatique de la pathologie, qui peuvent être un peu difficiles à publier dans d’autres revues spécialisées. Le comité de rédaction de la revue prévoit également publier des articles de synthèse et des éditoriaux pour enrichir la discussion quant à l’importance, les besoins et les défis que présente la pathologie numérique. Un autre aspect intéressant que fait ressortir la pathologie numérique est le besoin pour de l’éducation en pathologie 6

Canadian Journal of Pathology | Volume 9, Issue 1 | www.cap-acp.org

numérique. La transmission des connaissances aux pathologistes praticiens dans un format compréhensible simple est essentielle pour prendre une décision éclairée quant aux changements dans notre pratique. Nous favorisons les articles abordant ces sujets et nous analysons l’attitude des pathologistes et des fournisseurs de soins à cet égard. Nous prévoyons également publier un « coin de pathologie numérique » où les pathologistes, les résidents et les technologistes retrouveront des faits et de l’information axés sur le sujet. Des études plus approfondies sont nécessaires pour déterminer l’utilité pratique de la pathologie numérique et de la télépathologie. De nombreux autres sujets doivent être traités, notamment les questions portant sur le rapport coût-efficacité, l’éthique, la sécurité, l’aspect juridique et réglementaire. La revue collabore avec le groupe d’intérêt sur l’informatique de la pathologie de l’Association canadienne des pathologistes pour souligner et aborder ces préoccupations. Nous croyons fermement que davantage de discussions sérieuses et de publications de recherche ouvertes et transparentes nous permettront de nous orienter pour passer à cette nouvelle ère trépidante qu'entame notre pratique. George M. Yousef, M. D., Ph. D., FRCPC(Path) Rédacteur en chef, Revue canadienne de pathologie Références 1. Mirham L, Naugler C, Hayes M, Ismiil N, Belisle A, Sade S, et coll. Performance of residents using digital images versus glass slides on certification examination in anatomical pathology: A mixed methods pilot study. CMAJ Open 2016;4:E88-94. 2. Canadian Association of Pathologists Telepathology Guidelines C, Bernard C, Chandrakanth SA, Cornell IS, Dalton J, Evans A, et coll. Guidelines from the canadian association of pathologists for establishing a telepathology service for anatomic pathology using whole-slide imaging. J Pathol Inform 2014;5:15. 3. Gabril MY, Yousef GM. Informatics for practicing anatomical pathologists: Marking a new era in pathology practice. Mod Pathol 2010;23:349-58.

Revue canadienne de

pathologie rÉdaCteUr eN CHef George M Yousef, M. D., Ph. D. FRCPC (Path) rÉdaCteUr ÉMÉrite J. Godfrey Heathcote, M. A., M. B., B. Chir., Ph. D., FRCPC

Publication officielle de l'Association canadienne des pathologistes

table Des MatièRes

6

rÉdaCteUr foNdateUr Jagdish Butany, MBBS, MS, FRCPC direCtriCe-rÉdaCtriCe eN CHef Deborah McNamara

Lettre du rédacteur en chef Traverser une nouvelle ère de pathologie numérique : espoirs et défis

©les services des archives et des médias médicaux de l’Hôpital St-Michael

Volume 9 | numéro 1

direCtriCe dU CoNteNU ÉditoriaL Heather Dow direCtriCe artistiQUe Sherri Keenan tradUCtioN Lorraine Boury Jocelyne Demers-Owoka Éliane Fréchette aGeNCe d'ÉditioN Clockwork Communications inc. CP 33145, Halifax, N.-É., B3L 4T6 902.442.3882 / [email protected]

10

Droit d’auteur appartenant à l’Association canadienne des pathologistes. Tous droits réservés. Réimpression en tout ou en partie interdite sans le consentement écrit exprès de l’Association canadienne des pathologistes. Convention de vente des envois de publications canadiennes N˚ 43322513 ISSN 1918-915X (version imprimée) ISSN 1918-9168 (version en ligne) Retourner toute correspondance canadienne ne pouvant être livrée à : association canadienne des pathologistes 4, rue Cataraqui, bureau 310 Kingston, Ontario K7K 1Z7

www.cap-acp.org

Organoïdes vitaux : potentiel émergent dans le domaine de la modélisation des maladies Auteurs : Zsuzsanna Lichner, Elen Gócza, George M Yousef

18

La Revue canadienne de pathologie est une revue révisée par des pairs et publiée quatre fois par année, par Clockwork Communications Inc., au nom de l’Association canadienne des pathologistes. Nous acceptons les soumissions d’articles à [email protected] Nous déclinons toute responsabilité et nous ne nous engageons aucunement à l’égard du matériel non sollicité qui nous est envoyé. Tout article envoyé, y compris les photos, qui est accepté et venant d’un collaborateur non sollicité, deviendra la propriété de l’Association canadienne des pathologistes.

ÉDitoRial

aRtiCles De ReCheRChe Tendances à court terme du volume des tests et du taux de positivité pour trois tests microbiologiques courants Auteurs : Amina Kadri, Deirdre Church, Christopher Naugler

40

aRtiCles histoRiQUe Avons-nous atteint notre objectif? Un historique des laboratoires médicaux de l’hôpital st-michael Auteur : M Bernadette Garvey

66 78

ÉtUDes De Cas et CoMptes RenDUs Infection à Phialophora verrucosa du système de cheville d’un implant orbitaire : étude de cas et revue de la littérature Auteurs : Harleen Bedi et al.

Présentation inhabituelle d’un lymphome/leucémie lymphoblastique à précurseurs de cellules B accompagné d’importantes lésions osseuses lytiques Auteurs : Suvra Roy et al.

Revue canadienne de pathologie | volume 9, numéro 1 | www.cap-acp.org

7

eDitoRial This article was peer-reviewed.

KeyWoRDs: organoid, cancer, cancer modeling, 3D culture.

VitaL orGaNoids: eMerGiNG PoteNtiaL iN disease ModeLiNG authors:

Zsuzsanna Lichner1 PhD, Elen Gócza2 PhD, George M Yousef1,3 MD, PhD, FRCPC.

affiliations:

1

Department of Laboratory Medicine and the Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. 2 Applied Embryology and Stem Cell Research Group, Institute for Animal Biotechnology, Agricultural Biotechnology Center, Szent-Györgyi Albert Street 4, Gödöllő 2100, Hungary. 3 Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

All authors have provided CAP-ACP with non-exclusive rights to publish and otherwise deal with or make use of this article, and any photographs/images contained in it, in Canada and all other countries of the world.

W

hat is an organoid? Presently, most cell culture work is done in Petri dishes, where cells spread in two dimensions (2D). 2D cell culturing advanced our knowledge in several fields, including cancer research, developmental biology, and drug testing. However, the natural cell environment is three-dimensional (3D), thus it is time to add this third dimension to our research. Organoids are 3D, complex mini-organs that possess key features of their complex counterparts. They contain several cell types of the target organ and mimic its structure, histology and molecular characteristics. For example, kidney organoids have fully segmented nephrons, complete with podocytes, proximal tubule, loop of Henle, distal tubule and ureteric bud.1 Organoids are generated from stem cells. Several stem cell sources have been used for this purpose, such as embryonic stem cells, the more committed progenitor stem cells, adult stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Organoids were successfully derived from the gastrointestinal track, pancreas, brain, 8

Canadian Journal of Pathology | Volume 9, Issue 1 | www.cap-acp.org

retina, prostate, liver, lung, and Barrett’s esophagus. The holy grail of organoid biology lies in regenerative medicine: to functionally support failing tissues by creating organ surrogates. However, since organoids can also be generated from diseased tissues, they emerge as novel disease models with a wide range of application and ability. How can organoids model disease? Organoids have immense potential in the fields of developmental biology, pathobiology, and pharmaceutical testing. Here we illustrate how organoids can be allied in in modeling diseases, for example cancer. The stem cell population in most cancers is not well-defined, with no ubiquitous marker assigned. Therefore cancer modeling with organoids will require an additional step to obtain stem cells. This can be achieved by the overexpression of four stem cell factors: OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. The resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) will be very similar to embryonic stem cells, but will carry the genetic

eDitoRial VitaL orGaNoids (cont.)

In the future, we predict a parallel emergence of bioengineering approaches to support the needs of 3D culturing and further evolution of organoid biology.

background of the cancer cell they derived from.2 Cancer iPSCs will be differentiated towards their tissue of origin, using protocols established in developmental biology. The differentiation and errors in commitment can be viewed in real time. Recent development of super-resolution microscopy can contribute to our understanding on the function of different cell types and their communication at critical differentiation steps. Rare events, such as the formation of precancerous lesions, can be detected and cells-of-interest can be isolated for downstream studies (e.g. single-cell transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics). This information will enhance our understanding of early tumourigenesis, and may lead to the identification of biomarkers that specifically detect initial events in carcinogenesis. Further, better understanding of pre-cancerous lesions may allow the identification of novel drug that target this early stage, and prevent formation of full blown cancer. For functional studies, known mutations can be corrected, or new mutations can be added at the iPSC stage, using genomeediting techniques, such as CRISPR-Cas9. The effect of these modifications on differentiation and precancerous/ cancerous lesion formation can be monitored in the organoid. Cancer organoids also provide an unprecedented opportunity to study intra- and intertumour heterogeneity. Organoids derived

from different regions of the same tumour or from different patients, can be collected in cancer organoid banks. The use of these collections may help to identify key patho-biological steps in precancerous lesion formation and in tumour progression. Finally, the use of organoids can replace some of the ethically questionable and expensive animal models. Current limitations and future prospective. In spite of the tremendous potential and enthusiasm towards 3D organoids, several concerns have to be addressed. Organoids are cultured in the absence of patterning factors. This enhances their self-assembly but does not allow for higher level organ structuring. For example, morphogenbased determination of the full embryonic body plan is likely important to determine organ size and organ orientation.3 Organoids are not vascularized and therefore nutrition and oxygen supply can be very different from the in vivo conditions, constraining their size. Organoids lack the support of and the communication with their surrounding tissues. Recently much research focuses on how the physical cues from microenvironment are sensed, processed and responded to. For example, fluid shear stress and microenvironment rigidity impacts normal differentiation and maintenance of tissue identity.4 These prospects must be incorporated in the future organoid culturing strategies. The extent to which organoids can represent the target organ is debated. Adult tissuederived organoids, for example intestinal organoids are considered to be a true, functional model. However, when cells have to be reprogrammed to pluripotent state (iPS), the complexity and performance of the organoid derivative will depend on the differentiation procedure. In turn, the differentiation protocol relies on our incomplete understanding of embryonic development. For example, even the most complex kidney organoids do not cluster with the adult kidney’s transcriptome landscape.1 Instead, their mRNA profile resembles to

that of a first trimester fetus’s kidney. Importantly, the 3D geometry and the presence of different cell types in kidney organoid establish it as a superior representation of kidney, compared to other model systems. In the future, we predict a parallel emergence of bioengineering approaches to support the needs of 3D culturing and further evolution of organoid biology. A combination of bioengineering tools may create the best possible synthetic niche for organoid differentiation and maintenance. Additionally, genetic modifications can be introduced allowing organoids to perceive their environment as desired. Co-culturing that allows organoid vascularization will be a critical step ahead. Further research is going to determine their best use in disease modeling, regenerative medicine and development. References: 1. Takasato M, Er PX, Chiu HS, Maier B, Baillie GJ, Ferguson C, et al. Kidney organoids from human iPS cells contain multiple lineages and model human nephrogenesis. Nature. 2015;526:564-8. 2. Kim J, Hoffman JP, Alpaugh RK, Rhim AD, Reichert M, Stanger BZ, et al. An iPSC line from human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma undergoes early to invasive stages of pancreatic cancer progression. Cell Rep. 2013;3:2088-99. 3. Naylor RW, Skvarca LB, Thisse C, Thisse B, Hukriede NA, Davidson AJ. BMP and retinoic acid regulate anterior-posterior patterning of the non-axial mesoderm across the dorsal-ventral axis. Nat Comm. 2016;7:12197 4. Ip CK, Li SS, Tang MY, Sy SK, Ren Y, Shum HC, et al. Stemness and chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cell carcinoma cells under shear stress. Sci Rep. 2016;6:26788.

Revue canadienne de pathologie | volume 9, numéro 1 | www.cap-acp.org

9

ÉDitoRial Cet article a été révisé par des pairs.

Mots-ClÉs : organoïde, cancer, modélisation du cancer, culture en 3D

orGaNoïdes VitaUx : PoteNtieL ÉMerGeNt daNs Le doMaiNe de La ModÉLisatioN des MaLadies authors:

Zsuzsanna Lichner1, Elen Gócza2, George M Yousef1,3

affiliations:

1

Département de médecine de laboratoire et Centre de recherche Keenan en sciences biomédicales du Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Hôpital St. Michael, Toronto (Ontario) M5B 1W8, Canada 2 Applied Embryology and Stem Cell Research Group, Institute for Animal Biotechnology, Agricultural Biotechnology Center, Gödöllő (Pest) 2100, Hongrie 3 Département de médecine de laboratoire et de pathobiologie, Université de Toronto, Toronto (Ontario) M5G 1L5, Canada Tous les auteurs ont accordé à la CAP-ACP le droit non exclusif de publier et d’utiliser cet article, et toute image ou photo qu’il renferme, ou d’en disposer autrement, au Canada et partout ailleurs dans le monde. La version originale du présent manuscrit a été soumise en anglais, puis traduite en français par Éliane Fréchette, traductrice agréée.

u’est-ce qu’un organoïde? À l’heure actuelle, la majorité des travaux de culture cellulaire est effectuée dans des boîtes de Pétri, où les cellules se reproduisent en deux dimensions (2D). La culture cellulaire en 2D a permis d’approfondir nos connaissances dans plusieurs domaines, notamment la recherche contre le cancer, la biologie du développement et les essais pharmaceutiques. Toutefois, comme l’environnement naturel des cellules est tridimensionnel (3D), le temps est venu d’intégrer cette troisième dimension à la recherche. Les organoïdes sont des organes miniatures complexes et tridimensionnels qui possèdent les principales caractéristiques de leurs homologues complexes. Ils renferment plusieurs types de cellules de l’organe cible, en plus d’imiter sa structure et les caractéristiques histologiques et moléculaires qui le définissent. Par exemple, les organoïdes rénaux présentent des néphrons (et tous les segments qui leur sont associés), des podocytes, un tubule proximal, une anse de Henle, un tubule

Q

10

distal et un bourgeon urétéral1. Les organoïdes sont générés à partir de cellules souches. Diverses sources de cellules souches ont été utilisées à cet effet, notamment les cellules souches embryonnaires, les cellules progénitrices plus déterminées, les cellules souches adultes et les cellules souches pluripotentes induites (CSPI). Des chercheurs ont réussi à dériver des organoïdes du tractus gastrointestinal, du pancréas, du cerveau, de la rétine, de la prostate, du foie, des poumons et de l’œsophage de Barrett. Le Saint-Graal de la biologie organoïde est la médecine régénérative, dont l’objectif consiste à restaurer les fonctions de tissus défaillants en créant des organes de substitution. Or, comme les organoïdes peuvent aussi être générés à partir de tissus malades, ils représentent de nouveaux modèles de maladies dont les capacités et les champs d’application sont multiples. Comment les organoïdes peuvent-ils modéliser des maladies? Les organoïdes ont un potentiel énorme dans les domaines de la biologie du développement, de la

Canadian Journal of Pathology | Volume 9, Issue 1 | www.cap-acp.org

pathobiologie et des essais pharmaceutiques. Ci-dessous, nous décrivons comment les organoïdes peuvent servir à modéliser des maladies, comme le cancer. Dans la plupart des cas de cancer, la population de cellules souches, à laquelle aucun marqueur universel n’est associé, n’est pas bien définie. Par conséquent, une étape supplémentaire devra être prévue pour obtenir des cellules souches au moment de modéliser le cancer à l’aide d’organoïdes. Cet objectif peut être atteint par la surexpression des quatre facteurs de croissance des cellules souches suivants : le OCT4, le SOX2, le KLF4 et le cMYC. Les CSPI qui découlent de ce processus sont très semblables aux cellules souches embryonnaires, mais elles renferment le bagage génétique des cellules cancéreuses dont elles sont dérivées2. Les CSPI issues de cellules cancéreuses sont alors différenciées vers leur tissu d’origine au moyen de protocoles établis en biologie du développement. La différenciation et les erreurs de détermination peuvent être visualisées en temps réel. Les progrès récents relatifs à la microscopie haute

ÉDitoRial orGaNoïdes VitaUx (suite) résolution peuvent nous aider à mieux comprendre les fonctions de différents types de cellules et leurs interactions à diverses étapes critiques de la différenciation. Des événements rares, comme la formation de lésions précancéreuses, peuvent être détectés, et des cellules d’intérêt peuvent être isolées à des fins d’étude future (par exemple, en transcriptomique, en protéomique et en métabolomique). Ces renseignements amélioreront notre compréhension de la tumorigenèse précoce et pourraient permettre le repérage de biomarqueurs ayant la capacité de détecter les événements initiaux liés à la carcinogenèse. Par ailleurs, une meilleure compréhension des lésions précancéreuses pourrait permettre l’identification de nouveaux médicaments visant à cibler les tumeurs à un stade précoce dans le but de prévenir la formation de cancers. Dans le cadre des études fonctionnelles, les mutations connues peuvent être corrigées ou de nouvelles mutations peuvent être induites au stade des CSPI à l’aide de techniques d’édition du génome telles que la CRISPR-Cas9. Le suivi de l’impact de ces modifications sur la différenciation et la formation de lésions précancéreuses ou cancéreuses peut être assuré à même l’organoïde. Les organoïdes qui modélisent le cancer offrent également l’occasion sans précédent d’étudier l’hétérogénéité intratumorale et l’hétérogénéité intertumorale. Les organoïdes dérivés de différentes régions d’une même tumeur ou de différents patients peuvent être recueillis de manière à créer des banques. Le recours à ces banques peut contribuer à déterminer les principales étapes pathobiologiques qui caractérisent la formation des lésions précancéreuses et la progression tumorale. Finalement, l’utilisation des organoïdes peut remplacer certains des modèles animaux coûteux et discutables sur le plan éthique. Limitations actuelles et perspectives d’avenir Malgré l’immense potentiel des organoïdes tridimensionnels et le vif enthousiasme qu’ils suscitent, plusieurs

préoccupations doivent être prises en compte. Les organoïdes sont cultivés en l’absence de facteurs permettant la formation de modèles. Si cette façon de faire favorise l’autoassemblage des organoïdes, elle ne permet pas la structuration avancée des organes. Par exemple, la détermination morphogénétique du plan d’organisation embryonnaire complet est susceptible de jouer un rôle décisif dans la détermination de la taille et de l’orientation de l’organe3. Puisque les organoïdes ne sont pas vascularisés, leur apport en oxygène et en nutriments peut différer considérablement des conditions in vivo, restreignant ainsi leur taille. Les organoïdes ne reçoivent pas le soutien des tissus qui les entourent et ne peuvent interagir avec ces derniers. Une grande partie de la recherche menée récemment traite de la manière dont les organoïdes perçoivent et interprètent les signaux physiques transmis par le microenvironnement et de la façon dont ils y réagissent. Par exemple, la contrainte de cisaillement du fluide et la rigidité du microenvironnement ont un impact sur la différenciation normale des cellules et le maintien de l’identité tissulaire4. Ces considérations doivent être intégrées aux stratégies futures de culture des organoïdes. En outre, la mesure dans laquelle les organoïdes peuvent représenter les organes cibles fait l’objet de débats. Les organoïdes dérivés de tissus adultes, notamment les organoïdes intestinaux, sont considérés comme de véritables modèles fonctionnels. Cependant, lorsque les cellules doivent être reprogrammées pour atteindre un état pluripotent, la complexité et la performance du dérivé organoïde dépendent de la procédure de différenciation. Le protocole de différenciation dépend quant à lui de notre compréhension incomplète du développement embryonnaire. Par exemple, même les organoïdes rénaux les plus complexes ne peuvent être associés au transcriptome d’un rein adulte1. En effet, leur profil d’ARNm ressemble plutôt à celui du rein d’un embryon. Il est important de noter que la géométrie tridimensionnelle des organoïdes rénaux et le fait qu’ils contiennent différents types de cellules font d’eux une forme supérieure de

représentation des reins, comparativement à d’autres systèmes de modélisation. En ce qui concerne l’avenir, nous prévoyons l’émergence d’approches liées au génie biologique visant à répondre aux besoins de la culture 3D, parallèlement à l’évolution ultérieure de la biologique organoïde. Une combinaison d’outils de bio-ingénierie pourrait permettre de créer la meilleure niche synthétique possible pour la différenciation et la conservation des organoïdes. Qui plus est, des modifications génétiques peuvent être apportées afin de permettre aux organoïdes de percevoir leur environnement comme souhaité. La coculture qui permet la vascularisation des organoïdes constituera une avancée importante. Enfin, d’autres recherches permettront de déterminer comment tirer le meilleur parti des organoïdes dans les domaines de la modélisation des maladies, de la médecine régénérative et du développement. Références : 1. Takasato M, Er PX, Chiu HS, Maier B, Baillie GJ, Ferguson C et al. Kidney organoids from human iPS cells contain multiple lineages and model human nephrogenesis. Nature. 2015;526:564-568. 2. Kim J, Hoffman JP, Alpaugh RK, Rhim AD, Reichert M, Stanger BZ et al. An iPSC line from human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma undergoes early to invasive stages of pancreatic cancer progression. Cell Rep. 2013;3(6):2088-2099. 3. Naylor RW, Skvarca LB, Thisse C, Thisse B, Hukriede NA et Davidson AJ. BMP and retinoic acid regulate anterior-posterir patterning of the non-axial mesoderm across the dorsal-ventral axis. Nat Commun. 2016;7:12197. 4. Ip CK, Li SS, Tang MY, Sy SK, Ren Y, Shum HC et al. Stemness and chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells under shear stress. Sci Rep. 2016;6:26788.

Revue canadienne de pathologie | volume 9, numéro 1 | www.cap-acp.org

11

ReseaRCh aRtiCle This article was peer-reviewed.

KeyWoRDs: utilization, positivity rate, microbiology clinical testing.

sHort-terM treNds iN test VoLUMes aNd PositiVity rates for tHree CoMMoN MiCrobioLoGy tests authors:

Amina Kadri1 BN, Deirdre Church2,3,4 MD, PhD, FRCPC, Christopher Naugler2,3,5 MD, CCFP, FCFP, FRCPC.

affiliations: 1Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. 2 Calgary Laboratory Services, Calgary, AB, Canada. 3 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. 4 Department of Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. 5 Department of Family Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. The authors declare no competing interests. This work received no external funding. All authors have provided CAP-ACP with non-exclusive rights to publish and otherwise deal with or make use of this article, and any photographs/images contained in it, in Canada and all other countries of the world. ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine urine, blood, and throat culture test utilization and corresponding short-term trends in test volumes and positivity rates for a major Canadian city, and to evaluate if predictable variations in these values exist. Methods: Data was obtained from the Laboratory Information System of Calgary Laboratory Services for all patients assigned urine, blood, or throat cultures between January 2012 and December 2014, inclusive. Time series analyses were performed based on three years of test volume and positivity rate data. Linear regression modeling was then used to examine trends in monthly volume and positivity rates for these three types of tests.

Overutilization is a reality facing many laboratories that is costing healthcare systems at large.4 12

Results: Over the three years of study, microbiology test volumes increased steadily. Their associated positivity rates stayed relatively constant despite these increases. A strong seasonal relationship is apparent between throat culture positivity rates and test volumes, with higher positivity rates and volumes from November to June. Conclusions: A seasonal trend exists for throat culture microbiology test utilization. Laboratories may be able to prepare better for influxes of specimens by carrying out workforce and laboratory capacity planning. Laboratories can use the positivity rate of certain microbiology tests as a proxy measure for appropriateness of test ordering, which will guide initiatives to either reduce utilization or implement capacity planning.

Canadian Journal of Pathology | Volume 9, Issue 1 | www.cap-acp.org

ReseaRCh aRtiCle sHort-terM treNds (cont.) INTRODUCTION t is universally acknowledged that proper management of laboratory resources is of special concern in laboratory medicine and healthcare systems.1 Clinical microbiology laboratory testing plays a central role in modern medicine as it offers clinicians unique and timely information for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases and conditions.2,3 Clinical testing is routinely performed with automated analyzers in a central core laboratory, however microbiology tests additionally require trained technicians for microscopic examination and other visual interpretation of culture results.2 This contributes stress on alreadylimited laboratory resources, particularly when test volumes are high.

I

Overutilization is a reality facing many laboratories that is costing healthcare systems at large. 4 It is a growing concern in Canada where microbiology test utilization has been steadily increasing with additional downstream consequences for clinical care decisionmaking.2,5 These potential adverse outcomes will become even more pronounced as the Canadian population continues to grow and more persons enter the healthcare system.5 It is well known that laboratory tests are often ordered inappropriately and in one study, clinicians estimated 42.8% of tests to be unnecessary.6 While many initiatives have been attempted to reduce unnecessary testing and misuse of laboratory resources,2,7-9 the drivers of the overall trends concerning increased utilization have not yet been analyzed in detail. Furthermore, test volumes and positivity rates are subject to wide seasonal variations depending on the test type. 10,11 The ability to make informed predictions of future volumes based on these variations is important

for laboratory workforce and capacity planning, which could potentially mitigate some undesirable consequences of overutilization. In Calgary, Alberta, where laboratory test volumes are increasing at a rate much faster than population growth,12 demand forecasting for microbiology tests is especially valuable for such planning initiatives. The primary aim of this paper is to examine a population-based analysis of total microbiology test volumes and the corresponding positivity rates for the three highest-volume microbiology tests – urine tests, blood cultures, and throat cultures – for an entire major Canadian city (Calgary, AB) and its surrounding areas. We examined the temporal trends in positivity rates of these three tests as a measure of the selectivity with which they are being ordered, and analyzed how laboratories can utilize this information to execute more optimal capacity planning. METHODS This study was approved by the University of Calgary Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board. Data used in this study was obtained from the Laboratory Information System (LIS) of Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS) for every month between January 2012 and December 2014. CLS is the sole provider of laboratory services for Calgary and other regions of Southern Alberta, with a catchment population of approximately 1.4 million persons. The study population consisted of all patients within this catchment area who received laboratory services for urine tests, blood cultures, and/or throat cultures. Time series analyses were performed using SPSS version 20. Monthly test volumes were overlaid with monthly positivity rates using calculated linear regression best-fit modeling based on three years of test data. The resulting graphs were

Revue canadienne de pathologie | volume 9, numéro 1 | www.cap-acp.org

13

ReseaRCh aRtiCle sHort-terM treNds (cont.)

Of the three microbiology specimens, urine tests were ordered most frequently, with 730,852 tests ordered over the three-year period under study.

then analyzed to determine short-term trends. RESULTS The overall volumes and positivity rates for urine, blood, and throat microbiology tests during the 3-year study period are represented in Figures 1, 2, and 3, respectively. While the overall quantity of all three tests performed in Southern Alberta increased during the three-year period, there were apparent variations in the month-to-month utilization and corresponding positivity rates. Urine Tests Of the three microbiology specimens, urine tests were ordered most frequently, with 730,852 tests ordered over the three-year period under study. Though the volume of orders varied minimally on a month-to-month basis, overall volumes increased (p