NWFP Report 2012 - L'agriculture Familiale

Medicines deriving from NWFP are of great importance in rural areas due to limited access of rural people to modern medicine and treatments. Among the 235 ...
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NWFP Report 2012

Angola

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http://www.fao.org/forestry/nwfp/78836/en/ Food and Agriculture Organization, FOPP

Hugo Lehoux & Anis Chakib

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This document is still under construction, please don’t consider it as an official FAO publication

CONTENTS

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Contents 1 Plants and plant products 1.1 Food . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 Fodder . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 Medecine . . . . . . . . 1.4 Colorants and dyes . . . 1.5 Utensils, handicrafts and 1.6 Ornamental plants . . . 1.7 Exudates . . . . . . . .

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2 Animals and animal products 2.1 Living animals . . . . . . . . 2.2 Honey and bee-wax . . . . . . 2.3 Bush meat . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Other edible animal products

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PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

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Context The population of Angola is estimated around 18.993 million people in 2010 [FAOSTAT]. The total area of the country is 1.2467 million km2 with around 58.48 million hectares of forest in 2010 [FAO, 2010].

Introduction Main Non-Wood Forest Products Edible plants and plant products (mushrooms, fruits, leaves, tubers, roots, nuts) and medicinal plants are considered as the most important non-wood forest products (NWFP) in Angola [FAO et al., 1991]. Other NWFP include gums, honey, bushmeat and other edible animals, and fodder.

General information NWFP are first and foremost used for food and medicinal purposes. They serve as important protein providers especially for rural people. Beyond this, they represent a source of income for a large number of people, not only for rural inhabitants engaged to the exploitation, but also for urban population who are dedicated to their trading, especially women, who are the main traders of NWFP. Available information on NWFP in Angola is scarce.

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Plants and plant products Food

Wild food from plants include grains, fruit, tubers, leaves used as vegetable, roots used in soups or plant parts used in traditional teas [FAO and Zola, 1999]. It was estimated in FAO FRA [FAO, 2005] that wild fruits production and mushrooms production were respectively around 2,050 kg (tons?) and 2,444 kg (tons?) in 1998. The same source estimated drinks production from NWFP around 6.376 million liters in 1998. We can suppose that is palm wine and other fruit juices. These data are the only ones available but they are obviously underestimated.

1.2

Fodder

Production of fodder (herbs) in 1998 has been estimated around 4 395 kg (tons?) [FAO, 2005]. This amount is obviously underestimated.

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PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

1.3

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Medecine

Medicines deriving from NWFP are of great importance in rural areas due to limited access of rural people to modern medicine and treatments. Among the 235 classified tree species found in Angola, 40 are documented to be used in the traditional medicine [FAO and Zola, 1999]. Even in some urban areas these NWFP play an important role in satisfying the health needs of the population. Their economic, social and cultural values are recognized but difficult to estimate. The official medicinal plants production reported in FAO FRA [FAO, 2005] for the year 1998 is 90 kg. Obviously, this amount is underestimated. An enquiry conducted in three markets of Luanda in order to assess at least the trading of medicinal plants permit to list few species and there uses [FAO and Zola, 1999]. Local name Londo Lolo Sango-sango Brututu Mpidi Minkombo Alegria Nsani Kaxiringi Lemba nzau Kimbiolongo Mudia nioka Jindanda Capim de Deus Muelele Saku saku Afazena Santa Maria Ngadiadia Mpeve Nkasa Sinda

Part root bark stem root grain grain leaves fruit root all plant root root

Therapy Aphrodisiac stomach-ache cough aepathite stomach-ache stomach-ache fever fever spiritual spiritual aphrodisiac fever

all stem leaves grain leaves grain grain bark leaves

fever fever cough spiritual fever stomach-ache stomach-ache aphrodisiac cough

Table 1: Some medicinal plants commonly used in Angola [FAO and Zola, 1999]

1.4

Colorants and dyes

No data available.

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ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS

1.5

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Utensils, handicrafts and construction material

According to FAO FRA [FAO, 2005], 3292 combs and 1163 sculptures were officially produced with NWFP in 1998.

1.6

Ornamental plants

No data available.

1.7

Exudates

No data available.

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Animals and animal products Living animals

No data available.

2.2

Honey and bee-wax

Beekeeping in Angola is mainly a subsistence activity. The industrial sector producing honey and wax for commercial purposes collapsed soon after the independence of the country in 1975. Angola has a potential to enlarge its apiculture due to its richness in nectar yielding plants as well as in Eucalyptus spp. plantations, almost non-exploited for beekeeping activities. In 1998, around 706 liters of honey were officially produced for a value of Kzr 1,059,000 (in billion?) (US$ 63,968) according to FAO FRA [FAO, 2005]. But these data are wrong because quantities are obviously underestimated and the value is too high compare to production. According to estimations of FAO, Angola produced a mean of 23 000 tons of honey and 2 300 tons of Beeswax per year between 2000 and 2008 [FAOSTAT]. No exports data have been recorded.

2.3

Bush meat

Bushmeat plays an important role in Angola since food scarcity is serious in certain regions. In 1999 commercial hunting permits were issued to 164 persons for a value of US$ 20,532. The actual hunting rate is supposed to be far higher. The main species hunted in 1998 are listed in Table 1. In 1998, according to FAO FRA [FAO, 2005], authorities controlled 1,617 hunted animals for a total weight of 683 kg (tons?) of bushmeat and a value of Kzr 12,641,157 (in billion?) (US$ 751,644). But these data are wrong because quantities are obviously underestimated and the value is too high compare to production. According to FAOSTAT database, Angola produced around 7 500 tons of game meat per annum during the period 2000-2008.

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ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS

2.4

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Other edible animal products

There is a diversity of edible insects that are sold on the markets and that are important components of the population’s diet. In 1998, around 950 kg (tons?) of insects were officially harvested [FAO, 2005].

REFERENCES

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References FAO. Forest Ressources Assessment. FAO, 2005. FAO. Forest Ressources Assessment. FAO, 2010. URL http://www.fao. org/forestry/fra/fra2010/en/. FAO and A. Zola. NWFP statistics: Angola. FAO, 1999. FAO, D. Veloso, and R. Manga. Angola. In Séminaire sur les statistiques forestières en Afrique, 1991. FAOSTAT. URL http://faostat3.fao.org/home/.